One of the Best Way to Tell a Story? Become a Part of Someone Else’s.

One of the Best Way to Tell a Story? Become a Part of Someone Else’s.

Source: The Historian, painted in 1902 by Taos Society of Artists member, E. Irving Couse. If you’ve had any interest in promoting your business in recent years, you’ve probably been exposed to a tidal wave of information about storytelling marketing. In a nutshell, the movement was and continues to be catalyzed by brain research which highlights what we’ve intuitively known all along: If you frame the content of a website or any presentation in the context of an human narrative, multiple areas of the brains of both the storyteller and the listener are activated, making the message more relatable and thus, more memorable.1 Research shows our brains are not hard-wired to understand logic or retain facts for very long. Our brains are wired to understand and retain stories. A story is a journey that moves the listener, and when the listener goes on that journey they feel different and the result is persuasion and sometimes action. –Jennifer Aaker, Marketing Professor Stanford Graduate School of Business We’re simply wired for story. In many ways, the survival of our species–our ability to make sense of our place in a complex and often scary world–actually depends up on it. For this reason, storytelling has become big business with hefty emphasis on finding one’s authentic voice in order stand out online. After all, no one can replicate your unique blend of personal experiences, passions, skills and distinct interests. If you can get clear on why you do what you do, as well as how you landed where you are–from a marketing standpoint, you’re golden. An entire industry has taken off to teach micro-businesses and global corporations alike how to mine that gold–to hone in on those “watershed events” that have thrust us into a new way of thinking,...